285 Staff Sergeant Harry DALE AVC

Harry Dale was born 5th May 1887 in Burley, Wharfdale near Otley, Yorkshire. The son of George Dale a postmaster at Bramham, Yorkhire and Annie Foggin. In the First World War Harry Dale served as in the Army Veterinary Corps which later bacame the Royal Army Veterinary Corps.

285 Corporal Harry DALE AVC first saw active service in France on 15th August 1914 and received the 1914 Star. Later he was promoted to 285 Staff Sergeant Harry DALE AVC. He received several military decorations for his services in World War 1 including the 1914 Trio consisting of the 1914 Star, British War Medal 1914-1920 and the Victory Medal 1914-1919. The picture shows 285 S/Sgt Harry DALE AVC in his military riding uniform, his relationship with hourses probably started while working with his fathers postal horses in Bramham, Yorkshire.

He married Annie Sophia Kitching on 3rd July 1915 at her home village Dalton-Holme, Yorkshire and had three children Leslie, Kathleen May and Margery. At the time of his marage he was based as Bordon Camp, Hampshire.

After leaving the army he worked as a cartman then later a forman engineer in the transport industry in Doncaster. Harry Dale died at the age of 65 on 24th October 1952 in Bradford, Yorkshire.

Army Veterinary Corps Cap Badge WW1


Medal Index Card (MIC)


1914 Star with "5th Aug - 22 Nov 1914 Bar"
Commonly known as the Mons Star. Awarded to all those who had served in France and Belgium between 5 August and 22 November 1914. The medal comes complete with '5th Aug.-22nd Nov. 1914' clasp. A crowned four-pointed star with crossed swords and a wreath of oak leaves, having the royal cypher at the foot and a central scroll inscribed AUG NOV 1914. Ribbon is watered silk red, white and blue.

WW1 British War Medal
This medal was instituted to record the successful conclusion of the First World War. The observe has the uncrowned left-facing profile of King George V and on the reverse, St George on horseback trampling underfoot the eagle shield of Central Powers and a skull and cross-bones, the emblems of death. Ribbon is orange watered centre with stripes of white and black at each side and borders of royal blue.

WW1 Victory Medal
This is commonly known as the Allied War Medal because the same basic design and ribbon were adopted thirteen other Allied nations. The observe has the standing figure of Victory holding a palm branch in her right hand and stretching out her left hand. The reverse shows a laurel wreath containing a four-line inscription THE GREAT WAR FOR CIVILISATION 1914-1919. Ribbon is a double rainbow (indigo at edges and red in centre).


1914 Star (Mons Star)

History and Eligibility
In 1917 King George V approved the grant of the 1914 Star, often referred to as the 'Mons Star', to all those officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces, including civilian medical practitioners, nursing sisters, nurses and others employed with military hospitals, who actually served in France or Belgium on the establishment of a unit between 5 August 1914 and midnight on 22/23 November 1914. Officers and men of the Royal Navy, Royal Marines, Royal Naval Reserve and Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve who served on the establishment of a unit landed for shore service in France or Belgium between those dates were also eligible, but not those who served afloat.

On 19 October 1919 it was announced that The King had approved the issue of a clasp to those already awarded the 1914 Star ' who actually served under the fire of the enemy in France or Belgium ' between 5 August and 22 November 1914 .

Description
The decoration is a four-pointed star in bright bronze. The reverse is plain, but is stamped with the name and unit of the recipient. The clasp is of the same metal as the star, and is of simple design, with the inscription '5th Aug -22nd Nov 1914 ' embossed on a frosted ground. The clasp is designed to be sewn on to the ribbon.The ribbon is red, white and blue silk, shaded and watered. It is worn with the red nearest the centre of the chest. When the ribbon alone is worn possession of the clasp is indicated by a small silver rose affixed to the ribbon.

The total number of 1914 Stars awarded is as follows:


British War Medal 1914-1920

History
This medal was approved by King George V in 1919 to commemorate the services rendered by His Majesty's Forces and to record the bringing of the war to a successful conclusion. Eligibility for the award was later extended to cover the years 1919-1920, while post-war mine clearance at sea continued, as did service in North and South Russia, the Eastern Baltic, Siberia, Black Sea and Caspian Sea.

Description
The medal, which is silver, hangs from its ribbon by a straight suspender bar without swivel. The obverse bears the coinage effigy of His Majesty the King with the legend GEORGIVS V:BRITT: OMN:REX ET IND:IMP:. The reverse depicts a male figure mounted on horseback, trampling underfoot the eagle shield of the Central Powers and the emblems of death, a skull and cross-bones. Above is the risen sun of victory. The male figure was chosen because men had borne the brunt of the fighting.

The design symbolised the mechanical and scientific advances which helped to win the war. The silk ribbon has a central vertical stripe of gold with stripes of white and black at each side and borders of royal blue. It is not thought that the colours have any particular significance. The medal was designed was W McMillan, and struck by the Royal Mint. The recipient's name, rank, service number and unit are stamped on the bottom edge of the medal. Those awarded to Army officers, with the exception of the Royal Artillery, omit the name of the regiment or corps.

Eligibility
ROYAL NAVY
The medal was granted to the following classes of personnel who performed twenty-eight day's mobilised service between 5 August 1914 and 11 November 1918 both dates inclusive. The next-of-kin of those killed on active service received the medal whether or not the casualty completed the requisite period of service.

THE ARMY
The medal was issued to the following classes who either entered a theatre of war on duty, or who left places of residence and rendered approved service overseas, other than the waters dividing the different parts of the United Kingdom, between 5 August 1914 and 11 November 1918 inclusive. The next-of-kin of those killed on active service received the medal whether or not the casualty completed the requisite period of service.

ROYAL AIR FORCE
The medal was granted to the following classes who either entered a theatre of war on duty, or who left their places of residence and rendered approved service overseas, other than the waters dividing different part of the United Kingdom, between 5 August 1914 and 11 November 1918, both dates inclusive. The next-of-kin of those killed on active service received the medal whether or not the casualty completed the requisite period of service.

The medal was also granted to all officers, warrant officers, attested and enrolled NCO's and men of the RNAS, RFC and RAF who:

It will be noted that officers and members of the Women's Royal Air Force are not specifically referred to above. However, there were members of the WRAF who qualified for the medal by reason of their service with other womens formations. No member of the WRAF served overseas during the qualification period for the medal.

Medals issued to non-Europeans serving in units of the Labour Corps were struck in bronze.

Consideration was given to the issuing of clasps to commemorate certain battles and theatres of operations. Some 68 were proposed for Naval recipients, and 79 for the Army. The Naval clasps were authorised in August 1920 but not issued. It is not known which clasps were under consideration for the Army. No further action was taken and the idea was dropped in 1923 largely due to the costs involved. Very occasionally, examples of the clasps authorised for the Navy can be seen on miniature medals.

The total number of medals awarded is as follows:


Victory Medal 1914-1919

History
The medal was authorised in 1919 to commemorate the victory of the Allies over the Central Powers.

Description
The medal is laquered bronze and bears on the obverse the classical figure of Athene Nike, the goddess of Victory. On the reverse is an inscription, THE GREAT WAR FOR CIVILISATION. The version of the Victory Medal issued to members of the South African forces is identical, except that the obverse inscription is in both English and Afrikaans. The silk ribbon is red in the centre, with green and violet on either side shaded to form the colours of two rainbows. The medal is suspended from a plain ring. Anybody who received a Mention in Despatches was authorised to wear, sewn on to the ribbon, a single emblem of oak leaves in bronze. When the ribbon alone was worn, a smaller version of the emblem was fixed to it. The medal, designed by W McMillan, was authorised to obviate the exchange of Allied Commemorative War Medals. It was struck by the Royal Mint.

Eligibility
ROYAL NAVY
The medal was awarded to the following personnel who were mobilised and rendered approved service either:
(i) at sea between midnight 4/5 August 1914, and midnight 11/12 November 1918, or
(ii) on the establishment of a unit within a theatre of operations:

The following services did not qualify:

THE ARMY
For the Army the Victory Medal was granted to all officers, warrant officers, NCO's and men of the British, Dominion, Colonial and Indian Forces, members of women's formations who had been enrolled under a direct contract of service with His Majesty's Imperial Forces, civil medical practitioners, nursing sisters, nurses and other employed with military hospitals who actually served on the establishment of a unit in a theatre of war and within certain specified periods.

ROYAL AIR FORCE
The medal was granted to all officers and airmen who had either:

The claims of officers, airmen and women who became eligible an account of services rendered with the RN or Army, excluding the RNAS and RFC, prior to transfer to the RAF, were dealt with under the regulations of the RN or Army respectively.

All those who received the Victory Medal 1914-19 received the British War Medal 1914-20; recipients of the 1914 Star (or the 1914-15 Star) received both the Victory Medal and the War Medal. However, those who received the War Medal were not automatically entitled to the Victory Medal.

The total number of medals awarded is as follows:


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Last updated on: Wednesday, 6 August, 2008 11:15